7 Reasons that Pocket Knives Have Holes in Their Blade

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If you’ve been around knives for a little while, you’ve probably noticed a knife with a hole in the blade and wondered why it was there. Personally, I wondered the same question for a long time so I finally sat down and did some research.

Why do pocket knives have holes in the blade? Some of the top reasons that a knife company would put a hole in the blade of their pocket knives is to cut down on the weight of the knife, use the hole to replace the thumb stud for opening the knife, as well as to make the design stand out when placed alongside other pocket knives.

After a bit more research, I found many good reasons for knife companies to put holes in the blades of their pocket knives. 

Reasons for the Holes in the Blade of a Pocket Knife

Below I will go into the seven main practical reasons that I found for pocket knives to have holes in their blade. Many of the reasons that some pocket knives have holes in their blades are pretty amazing and unique.

While not all knives obviously have holes in their blade, after so much research and time thinking about this, I think the benefits of a hole in the blade of a pocket knife are very huge. It is a really clever and practical design choice that has far more pros than cons and it makes your pocket knife stand out from the pack in a stylish and good way.

1. Reduce Weight

It might seem obvious, but the more material that a knife is constructed of, the heavier it will inherently be. While a small hole in the blade might not seem like much, the blade material is one of the heaviest parts of the knife so reducing the amount of that material in any way will result in a pretty substantial weight decrease.

2. Reduce Friction

If you look at some cheese or high-end chef knives, you will probably notice that many of them have holes in the blade of the knife. The reason for this is to reduce the friction created between the knife blade and the material being cut by simply removing some of the blade material. 

The same concept can be applied to the holes that are found in the blades of many pocket knives. While it probably won’t make a difference if you aren’t cutting something dense that is thicker than the knife blade, the holes in the blade of a pocket knife are there just in case the need arises.

3. Opening

Pioneered by Spyderco—a high-quality knife company—the hole in the blade of a pocket knife that acts and replaces the thumb stud is becoming increasingly popular. A pocket knife that has a hole in the blade instead of a thumb stud is able to be opened with one hand and there is no part of the blade that projects out and will get in the way of cutting and using the knife.

4. Hanging

While not a common use for the hole that many pocket knives have in the blade, the hole can be used to hang on the wall or attach a cord for easy carry. Hanging a knife on the wall by the hole in the blade is commonly done with butcher knives, but can be done with pocket knives as well. 

5. Esthetics

It cannot be denied, a hole in the blade of a pocket knife adds an elegant look to many knife designs. It is not only a functional part of the knife that makes the whole tool lighter and easy to open, but a hole in the blade of a pocket knife can also be a bold fashion statement.

5. Brand Recognition

Spyderco has built a special brand look for itself by making some very iconic knives that have a noticeable and patented hole in the blade of the pocket knife. When someone that has been around knives for a little while sees that hole in the blade, an immediate thought of Spyderco comes to mind for most.

While other brands have found the practicality of a hole in the blade of their pocket knives and have implemented it into many of their designs, a hole in the blade of a knife is still widely recognized as something that makes the brand Spyderco unique.

7. Versatility

A hole in the blade of a pocket knife opens up a world of possible uses that aren’t commonly thought of. Using a hole in the blade, a pocket knife could be attached to the end of a stick and used as a primitive hunting spear. The possibilities are endless if you just think outside of the box.

Are There Any Downsides to a Hole in the Blade of a Pocket Knife?

Since we’ve discussed the reasons that a pocket knife would have a hole in the blade, I thought it would be only fitting to look and see if there are any downsides to having a hole in the blade of a knife.

Really, there is only one main concern when it comes to holes in the blade of a pocket knife: the structural integrity and durability of the blade.

While this isn’t even an issue in many of the high-quality knives that have holes in the blade, it can become a concern when you look at cheaper knives. If the hole is too big, the whole blade might become weak and have a high chance of cracking and splitting.

If the hole in the blade is too near the spine or back of the blade, the section of material that is right above the hole on the spine of the knife might become weak. Any hit or pressure on the back of the knife could possibly cave the top of the whole in if that area becomes too weak.

As long as the knife that has a hole in the blade is high-quality and is made well, there should be no downsides to having that hole in the blade. 

Is a Hole in the Blade on a Pocket Knife Actually Worth It?

This question can only really be answered by you. It all comes down to what you will be using your knife for and whether or not you like the look of a hole in the blade of your pocket knife.

If you are using your knife for intensive uses like survival or other activities, I would play it safe by getting a knife that has a solid blade for optimal strength and durability. However, if you are just planning on using your knife for every day carry and just use around the house, there would be no reason for steering clear of a hole in the blade of your pocket knife.

Personally, I really like the look and versatility that a knife with a hole in the blade has. As long as the knife is high-quality, you really can’t go wrong. However, the price tag on many of the high-quality knives with holes in the blades is pretty high, so it’s really up to each individual’s preference.

Conclusion

Overall, there are many cool benefits and uses for a knife with a hole in the blade. A pocket knife with a hole in the blade is so stylish and has so many practical gains that there isn’t really a reason not to like them.

A standard knife without a hole in the blade is an awesome tool that can complete many tasks, but a knife that has a hole in the blade can do everything that a standard knife can and more. A hole in the blade makes the knife lighter, easier to open, cut with less resistance, and makes it stand out from the crowd. So why not?

Townsen Bell

I'm the founder and primary author at Knife Manual. Over many years, I have become proficient at survival and bushcraft skills through lots of practice and many great teachers. I enjoy spending time outdoors, collecting knives, and learning new skills.

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